Members

Node Leaders:

Space, Place and Temporality Node

Christine Agius is Lecturer in Politics at Swinburne. Her areas of research include critical and poststructuralist international relations and security studies, with an emphasis on discursive constructions of identity and security, ontological security and critical constructivism. Empirically her work has focused on the Nordic states, particularly Swedish foreign and security policy, identity, and the welfare state. Other research interests include sovereignty, gender and humanitarian intervention.

Hind Ghandour is a PhD candidate at Swinburne Institute for Social Research.  Her research looks at the construction of national identity(ies) in exile. She is interested in the ways that individuals negotiate their national identities both within and outside the context of citizenship. In selecting the case study of Palestinians in Lebanon, naturalized citizens and refugees, her research aims to contextualize  the complex relation that exists between rights, citizenship and national identity.

Self, Culture and Subjectivity Node

Neil Thomas is a Senior Lecturer in Clinical Psychology in the School of Health Sciences.  He leads a research program into promoting personal recovery in persons with persisting mental health problems, including an interest in the impact of peer contact and modelling on self-stigma and identity.  He also conducts research into psychological models and therapies for hearing voices, including the interaction between representations of voices, self and others.  Neil also leads Swinburne’s research into online mental health interventions at the National eTherapy Centre.

Hadi Sohrabi Haghighat completed his PhD degree in Sociology at Swinburne in 2013. In his PhD research he explored the role Australian Muslim leaders play in facilitating or hindering the social integration of Australian Muslims. Prior to that, he undertook a Master’s degree in Sociology in which he researched the social impacts of internet use. He has published articles on Australian Muslims and the politics of the internet in the Middle East.

Media, Art and Technology Node

Dean Keep is a researcher/artist who teaches across a range of media disciplines including digital video and audio, digital imaging, convergence cultures and multi-platform narratives. His research has a strong focus on mobile media cultures/practices, digital ethnography and memory studies. Dean’s creative practice involves the use of heritage and emergent media technologies to examine the ways in which visual media may inform our understanding of historical time, place and personal/cultural memories. Dean is currently a Phd candidate at the School of Art, Australian National University, Canberra.

Saba Bebawi is a journalism and media researcher with research interests in the role of media in democracy-building, and media power. She holds a PhD on the topic of international news and alternative representation from the University of Melbourne, an MA research on media policy for community radio from Queensland University of Technology (QUT), and an MA in Communications from Monash University. She has practical experience as both a broadcast and print journalist within Australia and internationally since 1995. Dr Bebawi was a broadcaster/producer for Radio Jordan English service for four years. She also worked on a contract basis for CNN, World New Events (USA), and Dubai TV. In Australia she worked at 3ZZZ Melbourne Ethnic Community Radio, a consultant for SBS, and is a certified radio trainer. Dr Bebawi has previously held academic positions at Monash University in Australia and Zayed University in the UAE. Saba is currently a lecturer in Journalism at Swinburne University in Melbourne.

Members:

Viktoria Adler

Claire Ahern

Riccardo Armillei

Eugen Bacon

Glenda Ballantyne, Senior Lecturer and Discipline Convener in Sociology, Swinburne University of Technology

Carolyn Barnes

Laurentina Barreto Soares

Simone Battiston

Helen Berents, Lecturer in Policy and Governance, Queensland University of Technology

Marsha Berry

Sunil Bhar

Jahar Bhowmik

Hamza bin Jehangir

Peter Brace

Emanuel Braz

Mandy Brent-Houghton

Rachel Busbridge, Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral Fellow, Freie Universitat Berlin and a Research Associate at the Centre for Dialogue, La Trobe University

Michaela Callaghan

John Cash

Sally Clark

Des Delaney

Deborah Dempsey

Karen Devine

Adamantia Di Biase

Samantha Edwards-Vandenhoek

Scott Ewing

Karen Farquharson

Nilmini Fernando

Mark Finn

Janine Forbes-Rolfe

Keith Ford

Paula Geldens

Sanjib Goswami

Lauren Gurrieri

Dimity Hawkins

Alison Herron

John Hookham

Karen Hughes

Jeremy Hutton

Yvonne Joyce

Julie Kimber

Catarina Kinnvall

Louise  La Sala

Andrew Lane, Lecturer in the Communications Design Program, Swinburne University of Technology

Lee Lawrence

Michael Leach

Katie Linnane

Helena Liu

Peter Love

Abbey MacDonald

Ian Manners

Luca Marin

Christopher Mason

Brent McDonald

Matt McDonald

Craig McIntosh

Bronte McLeod, PhD Candidate (Clinical Psychology), Swinburne University

Anne McNevin

Timothy Moss

Lucy Nicholas

Chengxin Pan

Swati Parashar

Nigel Parsons

Andrew Peters

Alex Poll

Lesley Pruitt, Lecturer in International Development, RMIT University

Ivana Randjelovic

Julia Richardson

Andrew Roberts

Peter Robinson

Kerry Ryan

Robyn Sampson

Theresa Savage

Monique Scott

Sabina Sestigiani

Sarah Smith

Alexander Stewart

Simone Taffe, School of Design, Swinburne University of Technology

Tess Tekowski

Giang Trần Thị Thanh

Omid Tofighian

Karen Turner

Jasmine-Kim Westendorf

Marcus Wigan, Adjunct Professor Institute of Social Research, Swinburne University of Technology

Cai Wilkinson

Samuel Wilson

Bin Wu

 

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